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Clinton graduates have only a short distance to go for top quality higher education opportunities. The economies of a two-year community college are found only 20 miles south in Decatur.

Richland Community College is set on a beautiful 117-acre campus on the northeast side of Decatur. The college's Clinton Extension Center provides admissions, advise, registration, placement testing, financial aid, and other services. Selected courses and seminars are offered at off-campus sites in Clinton and other communities in the collegeÕs district.

About 6,000 students enroll in Richland Community College annually. The college awards associate in arts, associate in science, and associate in applied science degrees, plus certificates in various career courses. It also awards an associate in engineering science degree among the more than 60 majors available. About 60 percent of those earning associate degrees transfer to a four-year institution to earn bachelor's degrees.

Richland Community College also offers lifelong learning programs that include entrepreneurial activities, leisure learning for seniors, and topics related to personal interest and professional, technical, and career enhancement. Its Center for Business and Community Development provides assistance to area business and industry.

Richland College transfer students have a wide choice of nearby universities. The 45-acre suburban campus of Millikin University is located at Decatur. At Bloomington/Normal are Illinois State University and Illinois Wesleyan University. Heartland Community College and the Mennonite College of Nursing are also located at Bloomington. The University of Illinois at Champaign/Urbana is about 45 miles from Clinton, as is the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Millikin University enrolls about 1,900 students each semester. The independent, four-year, coed university offers more than 1,000 courses in 63 majors. Illinois State University occupies an 850-acre campus in Normal. Some 16,600 students are enrolled in 57 majors. The 63-acre suburban campus of Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington has nearly 1,900 undergraduates enrolled in more than 50 majors. Enrollment at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is nearly 36,500. It offers 140 majors. The University of Illinois at Springfield is much smaller, enrolling about 2,540 undergraduates. It also offers fewer majors.

In Lincoln, only 20 miles to the west of Clinton, is Lincoln College and Lincoln Christian College, two private, four-year institutions.



Like most small communities, culture in Clinton is largely homegrown. Concerts by high school bands and choruses fill all 300 seats in the school's auditorium. The annual productions by the high school theater arts class play to a packed house. Local festivals and special holiday events also draw big crowds.

The Easter Egg Hunt on Mr. Lincoln Square brings out the families of small children. Kids scurry from corner to corner seeking the precious finds as parents urge them on. Other happy occasions for Clinton area families are the Maydays Festival, with carnival vendors and major concerts on the square; and the Fourth of July, with its big parade and grand display of fireworks at nearby Weldon Springs State Recreation Area. On the Sunday after Thanksgiving, there's the annual Christmas parade and community tree lighting ceremony.

The annual Apple N Pork Festival, on the last weekend of September, celebrates harvest time in Clinton. The Apple N Pork Festival has been held on the grounds of the C.H. Moore Homestead (DeWitt County Museum) for more than 30 years. It's a celebration that draws more than 70,000 people to the city. There are food booths run by DeWitt County organizations serving a wide variety of foods, but especially pork in all its forms - cutlet sandwiches, pork chili, pickles and pork sandwiches, pork sausage sandwiches, BBQ pork ribs, hog legs, and pig ears. There's also emphasis on apples, with taffy apples, apple cake, apple and corn fitters, apple Danish rolls, fried apples, carmel apple wedges, apple pie, apple cider, and apple butter. In addition, there's live entertainment and dozens of crafters set up booths to merchandise their talents, among them a carousel horse maker and a dulcimer maker. The festival's flea market brings 300 vendors displaying their wares.

The Homestead, itself, is a continuing festival of sorts, with special events planned throughout its season, which runs from April through December. The season opens with kite flying. From June to mid-July some 50 antique quilts go on display at various points throughout the old mansion's rooms. At end of June, the Homestead is the site of an antique automobile show. In July, the Homestead puts on an old fashioned ice cream social and throughout August the museum offers special displays.

December brings on the Victorian Christmas decorations that fill the rooms of the mansion with rich colors. During this time, there's a Christmas Tea and candlelight tours of the Homestead are conducted on Friday evenings.

At Halloween, the Clinton Area Chamber of Commerce stages what is probably the biggest haunted house in Illinois. The Chamber takes over an old sales barn and creates 17 rooms of scariness and fright along a quarter-mile pathway. Junior and senior high school thespians and other volunteers help provide the thrills. Some 4,500 people walk hesitatingly through the haunted house annually.

Vespasian Warner Library is a remarkably beautiful building near downtown Clinton. The original building was built in 1906. In 1992, an addition quadrupled the space available and gave the total structure a striking appearance. At first glance, the library looks like a design by Frank Lloyd Wright from the early decades of his long career. Atop a white stone foundation are deep red brick walls with extravagant amounts of glass surrounded by dark red trim. The roof is red Spanish tile.

The library holds 45,000 volumes and subscribes to 150 periodicals. In addition, it stocks videos, compact disks, and books on tape. It offers four computer with connections to the Internet and two computers for word processing. It also lends a video camcorder, an overhead projector, and some typewriters.

Services of Vespasian Warner Library include a children's library and variety of programs for young people, several adult programs, and the use of meeting rooms. The largest room can seat 100 persons, another has space for from 40 to 50 individuals, and the third can accommodate as many as 15 people.

Clinton residents are certainly not shut off from major cultural events. Only 45 miles away, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the nationally heralded, $21 million Krannert Center for the Performing Arts hosts about 360 performances each year in its four individual theaters and outdoor amphitheater. Three university organizations - the Illinois Dance Theatre, the Illinois Opera Theatre, and the Illinois Repertory Theatre - utilize the facilities of the Krannert.

Among the world renowned artists and ensembles who have appeared at the Krannert are Pavarotti, Perlman, Duke Ellington, the Tokyo String Quartet, and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. The Krannert's Great Hall seats 2,092 persons and its vast stage can accommodate a full symphony orchestra and chorus. The Center's Festival Theatre, where operas, ballets, and other small ensemble presentations are performed, seats 979 persons. Plays and dance recitals are presented in the Colwell Playhouse. The Krannert's Studio Theatre is used for intimate, experimental productions.

The proximity of Illinois State University in Normal and Millikin University in Decatur also has its influences Clinton's art and entertainment scene. Millikin University's 2,00-seat Kirkland Fine Art Center provides fine family entertainment, bringing Broadway shows, symphony orchestras, ballet, and internationally renowned performers to its stage. Millikin University's Kirkland Fine Art Center has 2,000 and offers a great array of family entertainment - everything from Broadway shows to opera and ballet.



Clinton residents are fortunate to live in a small, rural community, close to nature and the many wonders of nature. Several attractive city parks provide "backyard" recreation for many residents. In addition, two State Recreation Areas are within a few minutes of the city, greatly enhancing opportunities for all manner of family outdoor fun. Only six miles from Clinton is the 10,000-acre Clinton Lake State Recreation Area, with its 4,900-acre lake. While the lake attracts more than a million visitors annually, there is plenty of time and space for residents to enjoy swimming in the waters off a 1,000-foot sand beach, water ski the long and winding body of water, and camp in one of some 300 campsites on the lakeshore.

There's hiking and biking, too, along several trails that wind through woods, 40 acres of restored prairie, and along the shore of the lake. Many picnic sites, shelters, and open spaces along the lakeshore and in wooded areas offer a day of family fun. Home Port Marina, on the southeast shore of the lake, has a full service bait and tackle shop and a snack shop. The marina also offers boat rentals.

At Weldon Springs State Recreation Area, only two miles south of Clinton, residents can hike the posted nature trail that winds for two miles around 29-acre Weldon Springs Lake in the heart of the beautiful 442-acre parkland. The lake is a great place to catch small pan fish. The campgrounds has 78 electrical sites close to showers and restrooms and water service. For family picnics there are eight large picnic areas (six with shelters and four with volleyball courts). At the picnic sites there are cooking grills or fire rings, water service, and restroom facilities. At various other points in the park are small groupings of picnic tables.

Many area residents have been married at one of the two amphitheaters in the park. These amphitheaters are also the settings for plays, concerts, movies, church services, and other programs.

The Clinton Community YMCA is another recreation resource for the Clinton residents. Its facilities include an indoor swimming pool, gymnasium, and weight room. The Y offers members a wide-ranging program of activities, sports, exercise, and fitness. Special fees make many of the programs available to nonmembers.

A bowling center and nearby health club provide year around fun for the whole family.



Clinton Community Unit School District 15 serves the city with four elementary schools, a junior high school, and a senior high school. Two of the elementary schools are pre-kindergarten through second grade. The other two schools house grades three through five. More than 2,300 young people are enrolled in the district's schools. About 75 percent of high school graduates continue their education at a technical college, college, or university. Nearly 10 percent make it to the list of Illinois State Scholars.

The district's elementary schools focus on providing the basics in education, augmented by music, art, and physical education. The district also offers a unique "Pre-K 3" program for three-year-olds. In this, teachers regularly visit the home bringing different activities, books, toys, and ideas to encourage and stimulate a child's development. Once a week, all in the program, children and parents, come together for play sessions.

At Clinton Junior High School, where more than 550 are enrolled, students are helped through the transition from the structured environment of elementary school to the freedom and personal responsibilities of high school.

Clinton Senior High School has more than 670 students enrolled. They choose from some 165 different courses, including three years of French and Spanish and an advanced placement course in calculus. Juniors and seniors who qualify can enroll in several college level courses offered at Richland College while still in high school. The courses include composition, calculus and analytic geometry, and psychology. Through the high school's distance learning capability, qualified students can also enroll in college level business law, marketing, and German.

Reflecting the city's location in a strong agricultural area, the high school offers 17 agriculture and agribusiness courses. It also places emphasis on career courses leading to entry level employment in numerous trades and professions. Students can also earn credit for participation in a marching band, symphonic band, concert ban, flag corps, mixed chorus, and advance chorus. A variety of extracurricular clubs and organizations are also available to students. The school's 300-seat auditorium is the setting for concerts and performances by theater arts students.

The high school fields a full roster of competitive sports teams for boys and girls. Conference and regional championships are regularly won by the school's sports teams.

Two preschool and daycare centers are located in Clinton, serving the needs of working parents and their preschool youngsters.

Higher Education

Clinton graduates have only a short distance to go for top quality higher education opportunities. The economies of a two-year community college are found only 20 miles south in Decatur.

Richland Community College is set on a beautiful 117-acre campus on the northeast side of Decatur. The college's Clinton Extension Center provides admissions, advise, registration, placement testing, financial aid, and other services. Selected courses and seminars are offered at off-campus sites in Clinton and other communities in the college's district.

About 6,000 students enroll in Richland Community College annually. The college awards associate in arts, associate in science, and associate in applied science degrees, plus certificates in various career courses. It also awards an associate in engineering science degree among the more than 60 majors available. About 60 percent of those earning associate degrees transfer to a four-year institution to earn bachelor's degrees.

Richland Community College also offers lifelong learning programs that include entrepreneurial activities, leisure learning for seniors, and topics related to personal interest and professional, technical, and career enhancement. Its Center for Business and Community Development provides assistance to area business and industry.

Richland College transfer students have a wide choice of nearby universities. The 45-acre suburban campus of Millikin University is located at Decatur. At Bloomington/Normal are Illinois State University and Illinois Wesleyan University. Heartland Community College and the Mennonite College of Nursing are also located at Bloomington. The University of Illinois at Champaign/Urbana is about 45 miles from Clinton, as is the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Millikin University enrolls about 1,900 students each semester. The independent, four-year, coed university offers more than 1,000 courses in 63 majors. Illinois State University occupies an 850-acre campus in Normal. Some 16,600 students are enrolled in 57 majors. The 63-acre suburban campus of Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington has nearly 1,900 undergraduates enrolled in more than 50 majors. Enrollment at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is nearly 36,500. It offers 140 majors. The University of Illinois at Springfield is much smaller, enrolling about 2,540 undergraduates. It also offers fewer majors.

In Lincoln, only 20 miles to the west of Clinton, is Lincoln College and Lincoln Christian College, two private, four-year institutions.



Clinton families take comfort in knowing they have fast access to high quality medical care when needed. Fifty-two-bed Dr. John Warner Hospital is located in the heart of the city. It has six physicians on staff, with a courtesy and consulting staff of 79 representing all major medical specialties and subspecialties.

The hospital was founded in Clinton in 1905 by its namesake, Dr. John Warner. In 1909, the City of Clinton acquired ownership and has held it since. In 1994, the hospital established its Rural Health Clinic, an outpatient service to the community and the area. In the near future, the hospital expects to construct a new medical office building which will house the Rural Health Clinic and offices for medical specialists and other physicians. At the same time, it will enhance its radiology department, providing complete diagnostics on the first floor of the existing hospital.

Warner Hospital shares mobile CT scan, MRI, mammography, ultrasound, and echo equipment with other area hospitals. Its 24-hour emergency service is staffed by physicians and nurses trained in emergency medicine and trauma. Among the medical services of the hospital are laboratory, x-ray, respiratory therapy, physical therapy, outpatient surgery, cardiac rehabilitation, stress testing, and nuclear medicine.

Physicians serving on the active and consulting staffs include specialists in cardiology, podiatry, ophthalmology, obstetrics/gynecology, orthopedics, ear/nose/throat, audiology, urology, neurology, oncology, gastroenterology, and pulmonology.

The Clinton area has one privately operated nursing home in a semi-rural location and a nursing home owned by DeWitt County. The latter is soon to close and be replaced by a $10 million retirement community with all levels of living from independent to nursing home care. This will augment retirement centers located in two midrise buildings on the city's east side. Nearby Decatur and Bloomington-Normal have several high quality nursing homes as well.



Clinton citizens have the best of two worlds of government - the responsiveness of elected officials and the management skills of a professional administrator. The city is governed by a mayor/council form of government. The council employs a professional city manager to oversee the day to day operations of government and to carry out the mandates of the council.

Business and industry are welcome in Clinton and the city offers a variety of economic incentives to encourage expansion of existing business and industry and attract new companies to the community.

The Clinton Police Department is housed in the city administration building. It has 13 sworn officers, four dispatchers, and a part-time secretary. Police officers patrol the city's 30 miles of streets. Residents dial an enhanced 911 in police or fire emergencies.

The department sponsors a variety of public service programs. Among them are D.A.R.E., the national anti drug program; Stranger Danger and the Safe House programs; Neighborhood Watch; CrimeStoppers; and Operation Cool, the national program to encourage use of auto seatbelts. It also promotes Halloween and bicycle safety.

The department's K-9 unit demonstrates its anti drug skills and the Chief of Police gives talks to drivers education classes at the high school. The department is a member of a three-county drug taskforce, coordinating efforts and sharing information.

The Clinton Fire Department has three full-time firefighters and 34 volunteers who are paid on call. The department operates a 75-foot aerial ladder truck, four pumpers, a 1750-gallon tank truck, and one utility vehicle. It has two jaws of life tools for extrications.

Members of the department built a safety house which is towed to schools to teach youngsters how to escape a smoke-filled building. Firefighters also give talks to apartment dwellers on fire prevention and safety.

Training is an important factor in the department. All volunteers have undergone training at the University of Illinois' smoke tower and twice a month they receive training at the station or at other locations in the community. Two volunteers employed by Dr. John Warner Hospital are trained emergency medical technicians.

Illinois Power Company provides the community with electricity and natural gas. The municipality supplies water and treats waste water. Cable television service is provided by Triax Cablevision. An AM/FM radio station and a daily newspaper also serve the community.

Clinton is the seat of government for DeWitt County. The old courthouse no longer stands on the square in the middle of town. Instead, county government is housed in a handsomely modern red brick building that fills most of a square block area across from the Clinton City Hall. Here, county officials administer a variety of programs that serve the people of the county. Here, too, is the office of the sheriff, the county's chief law enforcement officer, and his staff.


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