Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
17,202
1980
21,249
23.5
2000
24,719
16.3
2010
27,646
11.8

Chartered in 1656, the town of Bridgewater historically flourished as an industrial and agricultural center within Southeastern Massachusetts. The raising of livestock and crop cultivation on farms comprising several hundred acres were common in the outlying areas of the community. As early as the 18th century, foundries were operating along the northern periphery of the downtown where iron forging for the Revolutionary and Civil Wars were produced. A century later, shoe, nail and brick manufacturing emerged in the area, employing hundreds of former agricultural workers from nearby farms or immigrants from distant lands.

The historic character of the community is largely preserved in the Federal, Italianate and Greek Revival commercial and civic structures surrounding the central common. Landscaping on the common and elsewhere in the downtown is meticulously maintained by the Bridgewater Improvement Association, a nonprofit organization devoted to the beautification of the community. The downtown area remains a vital center of community life where such activities as Autumn and Christmas holiday festivals are conducted each year.

Bridgewater today is a growing community of over 20,000. Its central location at the interchange of Route 24 and Interstate 495 provides convenient access to Boston, Providence and Cape Cod. The town also carries the distinction of hosting the oldest and largest state college in Massachusetts, Bridgewater State College.

This rich history and diversity of activities has made Bridgewater an attractive place to residents and business alike.

 

Median Household Income $41,933
State Rank 15 1
% of State Average 113.5

Per Capita Income $14,088
State Rank 290
% of State Average 8 1.8

Labor Force
Employed 10,220
Unemployed 680
Unemployment Rate 6.8
Statewide 3.9

Population 24,372

Tax $14.84

Media
Bridgewater Independent
The Enterprise
The Free Bird Times
BTV Cable 8/Time Warner

Utilities
Eastern Edison
Bay State Gas

Water
Town water
very few private wells

Sewer
Mostly private septic

Solid Waste
Private Hauler

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Open Town Meeting

 

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 697-0919

Assessor
(508) 697-0928

Building Inspector
(508) 697-0904

Clerk
(508) 697-0921

Conservation Commission
(508) 697-0907

Department of Public Works
(508) 697-0931
Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 697-0920

Fire Department
(508) 697-0900

Health Department
(508) 697-0903

Historical Commission
(508) 697-0920

Industrial Finance Board
(508) 697-0920

Library
(508) 697-3331

Planning Board
(508) 697-0942

Police Department
(508) 697-0194

Selectmen
(508) 697-0919

School Superintendent
(508) 824-2730

Zoning Board
(508) 697-0904

 

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
6,988
1990
10,590
51.6
2000
12,678
19.7
2010
14,736
16.2

The town of Carver is situated in Southeastern Massachusetts, 38 miles from Boston, and is the site of three rivers, brooks ponds and sizable swamps. The town had large cedar and pine stands so the abundant water power provided energy for many sawmills. The discovery of iron ore in the region stimulated the development of iron foundries as well, while the agricultural economy in the town was based heavily on cranberries. In the 1940's, the town of Carver produced more cranberries than any town in the world and despite dramatic population increases, Carver's cranberry bogs are still an important part of the town. Additionally, the bogs' forest land and large amounts of water serve to limit development and retain a rural flavor for the community.

Money from iron built handsome mansions in Carver, some of which still exist, while the foundries and bogs drew immigrant workers from the Cape Verde Islands and from Finland who remain a part of the towns population. Although Carver is now clearly a suburban commuter community, it is one of the few towns with a significant remaining agricultural component as cranberries have become a big national business.

Median Household Income $38,678
State Rank 194
% of State Average 104.7

Per Capita Income $14,122
State Rank 288
% of State Average 82

Labor Force
Employed 4,740
Unemployed 407
Unemployment Rate 2.9
Statewide 3.9

 

 

Population 12,469

Tax
$18.26R
$27.63 C

Media
The Enterprise
MPG Newspapers/Carver Reporter
Free Bird Times
Old Colony Memorial
Patriot Ledger
Adelphia Cable Communications

Utilities
Commonwealth Electric
Commonwealth Gas

Water
Private wells

Sewer
Private septic

Solid Waste
Combustion:
Rochester

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Executive Secretary
Open town meeting

 

 

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 866-3400

Assessor
(508) 866-3410

Building Inspector
(508) 866-3405

Clerk
(508) 866-3403

Conservation Commission
(508) 866-8133

Department of Public Works
(508) 866-3425
Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 866-3400

Fire Department
(508) 866-3440

Health Department
(508) 866-3420

Historical Commission
(508) 866-3400

Industrial Finance Board
(508) 866-3400

Library
(508) 866-3415

Planning Board
(508) 866-3400

Police Department
(508) 866-2000

Selectmen
(508) 866-3400

School Superintendent
(508) 866-5200

Zoning Board
(508) 866-3400

 

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
5,513
1990
6,526
18.4
2000
7,318
12.1
2010
8,174
11.7

The town of Halifax is a pastoral community located in the geographic center of Plymouth County and was first settled in 1669. Early colonists found extensive woods of white and pitch pine, cedar and oak. The first saw mill was built about 1728 to process this lumber. Agriculture and lumbering continued to be the basis of the community's economy and by 1794 there were five sawmills in operation. Lumber was sent south through the Taunton River system and east to the Jones River and North River shipyards. To the sawmills were added iron furnaces and a cotton factory by 1815 and a large woolen mill in 1822. Halifax was the site in 1795 of an early effort to construct a canal between Buzzards Bay and Massachusetts Bay by connecting the Taunton and North Rivers through the ponds of Halifax and Pembroke. During the 19th century, as other communities became increasingly industrialized and Halifax's industries burned or closed, the town's economy shifted back to agriculture and substantial poultry and cranberry production was recorded. The residential character of the town became very pronounced as roads like Route 106 and 58 provided better access to the town. In addition, the scattered summer cottage colonies began conversions to year-round housing. Further growth is expected with the establishment of the Old Colony Railroad.

Median Household Income $37,197
State Rank 211
% of State Average 100.7

Per Capita Income $15,233
State Rank 234
% of State Average 88.4

Labor Force
Employed 3,313
Unemployed 202
Unemployment Rate 3.3
Statewide 3.9

Population 7,239

Tax $14.84

Media
The Enterprise
MPG Newspapers/Halifax/Plympton Reporter
Patriot Ledger
Harron Cable

Utilities
Eastern Edison
Bay State Gas

Water
Town water
some private wells

Sewer
Private septic

Solid Waste
Combustion: Rochester

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Executive Administrator
town meeting

Municipal Offices

Main number
(781) 293-7970
Town website http://wwwtiac.net/users/halifax

Assessor
(781) 293-5960

Building Inspector
(781) 293-6557

Clerk
(781) 293-7970

Conservation Commission
(781) 293-1735
Department of Public Works
(781) 293-4760

Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(781) 294-1316

Fire Department
(781) 293-2323

Health Department
(781) 293-6768

Historical Commission
(781) 294-7501

Library
(781) 293-2271

Planning Board
(781) 293-1736

Police Department
(781) 293-5761

Selectmen
(781) 294-1316

School Superintendent
(781) 585-4313

Zoning Board
(781) 293-1736

 

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
5,931
1990
7,785
31.3
2000
9,086
16.7
2010
10,326
13.7

The town of Lakeville is an inland rural town on the Plymouth-Bristol County boundary. First settlement of the town was in approximately 1702 when a forge was erected to use the bog iron in Assawompset and Long Ponds. The town was basically agricultural since it lacked the major water resources to attract early industrialists. In the 19th century, however, its limited water power allowed development of a tack and nail factory, a tannery and some small shoemaking companies. Later in the century, neighboring communities drew off a significant percentage of the Lakeville water supply and cut off the cottage and recreation potential of lakeside properties.

With the shriveling of industry, the town has remained essentially as it began, a pleasant rural community still showing significant agricultural character but with some suburban development pressures visible. Residents are very proud of the community's continuing beauty, and enjoy using the Long Pond recreational area which offers traditional summer sports as well as ice skating, ice boarding and ice fishing. The woodlands surrounding the town’s lakes provide hiking and picnicking opportunities while three golf courses, indoor tennis facilities and fitness clubs provide for the athletic interests of residents.

Median Household Income $44,861
State Rank 110
% of State Average 121.4

Per Capita Income $16,189
State Rank 189
% of State Average 94

Labor Force
Employed 3,880
Unemployed 247
Unemployment Rate 3.8
Statewide 3.9

 

Tax $12.19

Media
The Enterprise
Middleborough Gazette
Free Bird Times
Lakeville Independent
New Bedford Standard Times
Taunton Daily Gazette
MediaOne

Utilities
Middleborough Gas & Electric
Bay State Gas
Commonwealth Electric
Taunton Municipal

Water
Private wells
purchase from Middleborough & Taunton

Sewer
Private septic

Solid Waste
Combustion: Rochester

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Executive Secretary
town meeting

 

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 946-8803

Assessor
(508) 947-4428

Building Inspector
(508) 946-8804

Clerk
(508) 946-8814

Conservation Commission
(508) 947-6363

Department of Public Works
(508) 947-9521

Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 946-8803

Fire Department
(508) 947-4121

Health Department
(508) 946-8805

Historical Commission
(508) 947-4672

Library
(508) 947-9028


Planning Board
(508) 947-2143

Police Department
(508) 947-4425

Selectmen
(508) 946-8803

School Superintendent
(508)763-5183

Zoning Board
(508) 947-9495

 

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
16,404
1990
17,867
8.9
2000
19,345
8.3
2010
20,455
5.7

The town of Middleborough is a 70 square mile historic industrial town on the Nemasket River and was a major native settlement area used for seasonal fishing, hunting and berry gathering. The town is one of only a handful of Southeastern Massachusetts communities that retained a sizable Indian population throughout the colonial period. The first European settler was Sir Christopher Gardner, a fugitive from English justice who settled among the Nemasket Indians in 163 3. When he was captured and returned to England, it was several years before a small group of white settlers led by Elizabeth Poole established themselves within the town.

Agriculture, fishing, hunting and some lumbering were the main occupations of early settlers and as Indian settlements dwindled, the town's industries grew. There was a good deal of bog iron found in Middleborough, which stimulated the iron and mill industries. A large, self-contained industrial complex was developed by Judge Peter Oliver, including a blast furnace, forge, slitting mill, blacksmith, finishing & hammer shops, grist mill and fuel storage, all of which, along with a country estate, was confiscated when Oliver fled the Revolution as a loyalist.

Although the iron industry dominated the Federal period, Middleborough also made shovels, textiles, straw bonnets and woolens. Immigrant populations of Swedes, Italians, Canadians and Armenians followed the industrial jobs available. After the Civil War, the town became a rail center, attracting industrial development, lumbering, box mills, brick making and the well-known Maxim Motor Company, which produced fire trucks since 1914. The town offers sites for industrial parks and is involved in an aggressive campaign to bring business in to offset the major suburban residential development the town has experienced in recent years.

Visitors to Middleborough now can enjoy the partially restored Oliver Mills Park on the site of Judge Oliver's industrial complex and follow the spring herring run which brings thousands of alewives upstream to spawn. Residents are particularly proud of the historic museums in town which feature recreations of 19th century homes, historic fire engines, Nemasket Indian artifacts and memorabilia of the famous midgets General and Mrs. Tom Thumb, natives of the town.

Median Household Income $36,573
State Rank 222
% of State Average 99

Per Capita Income $14,165
State Rank 286
% of State Average 82.2

Labor Force
Employed 8,751
Unemployed 750
Unemployment Rate 4.3
Statewide 3.9

Population 19,197

Tax $15.57

Media
The Enterprise
Middleborough Gazette
Free Bird Times
Lakeville Independent
Taunton Daily Gazette
MediaOne

Utilities
Middleborough Gas & Electric

Water
Municipal wells
some private wells

Sewer
42% town sewer
some private septic

Solid Waste
Combustion: Rochester

Form of Government
Town Manager
Open town meeting

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 947-0928

Assessor
(508) 946-2410

Building Inspector
(508) 946-2426

Clerk
(508) 946-2415

Conservation Commission
(508) 946-2406

Department of Public Works
(508) 946-2480

Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 947-0928

Fire Department
(508) 946-2461

Health Department
(508) 946-2408

Historical Commission
(508) 947-0928

Industrial Finance Board
(508) 947-0928

 

 

Library
(508) 946-2470

Planning Board
(508) 946-2425

Police Department
(508) 946-2451

Selectmen
(508) 946-2405

School Superintendent
(508) 946-2000

Zoning Board
(508)947-0928

 

Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
1,974
1990
2,384
20.8
2000
2,714
13.8
2010
2,993
10.3

Residents of Plympton say that driving into the center of this Plymouth County town is like taking a step back into simpler times and they would not have it any other way. Two hundred year old houses share space on Route 58, the main street, with a gas station, a farm stand, a bank, a restaurant and a graveyard where the passing years have tilted the ancient slate headstones to eerie angles.

Median Household Income $46,151
State Rank 94
% of State Average 124.9

Per Capita Income $17,150
State Rank 147
% of State Average 99.6

Labor Force
Employed 1,290
Unemployed 99
Unemployment Rate 7.1
Statewide 3.9

 

Population 2,681

Tax $17.57

Media
The Enterprise
MPG Newspapers/Halifax/Plympton Reporter
Free Bird Times
Harron Cable

Utilities
Commonwealth Electric
No gas available

Water
Private wells

Sewer
Private septic

Solid Waste
Transfer Station: Plympton

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Open town meeting

 

Municipal Offices

Main number
(781} 585-3220

Assessor
(781) 585-3227

Building Inspector
(781) 585-3220

Clerk
(781) 585-3220

Conservation Commission
(781) 585-3220

Department of Public Works
(781) 585-3703
Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(781) 585-3220

Fire Department
(781) 585-2633

Health Department
(781) 585-3220

Historical Commission
(781) 585-3220

Industrial Finance Board
(781) 585-3220
Library
(781) 585-4551

Planning Board
(781) 585-3220

Police Department
(781) 585-3339

Selectmen
(781) 585-3220

School Superintendent
(781) 585-4313

Zoning Board
(781) 585-3220

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
9,085
1990
9,867
8.9
2000
10,391
5.3
2010
10,782
3.8

Raynham, established in 1731, was once a part of the City of Taunton. Known as the site of the earliest successful iron works (1652), Raynham continues today as a thriving successful community. Once a rural hamlet, the town today is, in large part a suburban bedroom community, but because of its location at the crossroads of Routes 24, 44 and 495 (as well as Routes 138 and 104) it is fast becoming a commercial center as well. Raynham Woods Commerce Park, a 330 acre site, is home to many major corporations and the Raynham Dog Track on Route 138 is known as one of the best greyhound tracks in the nation.

Raynham has always been proud of its school system and the quality of education it provides for its children. At the high school level, children have a choice of superb public schools: Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School, BristolPlymouth Regional Vocational High School and Bristol County Agricultural High School.

Raynham also provides terrific recreational programs and facilities for both children and adults. The town’s 200 acre Borden Colony complex has many fields for soccer, baseball and softball, plus acres of forest and farmlands for passive recreation. Johnson’s Pond is open to the public for fishing, picnicking and boating.

Median Household Income $44,846
State Rank 111
% of State Average 121.4

Per Capita Income $17,025
State Rank 156
% of State Average 98.8

Labor Force
Employed 5,187
Unemployed 308
Unemployment Rate 5.6
Statewide 3.9

Population 10,345

Tax
$13.32 R
$14.95 C

Media
The Enterprise
Free Bird Times
Taunton Daily Gazette
MediaOne

Utilities
Taunton Municipal Light
Bay State Gas

Water
Municipal wells
some private wells

Sewer
Mostly private sewer
some Town sewer

Solid Waste
Landfill: local

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Executive Secretary
Open town meeting

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 824-2700

Assessor
(508) 824-2704

Building Inspector
(508) 824-2708

Clerk
(508) 824-2700

Conservation Commission
(508) 824-2706

Department of Public Works
(508) 824-2718
Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 824-2707

Fire Department
(508) 824-2713

Health Department
(508) 824-2707

Historical Commission
(508) 824-2700

Industrial Finance Board
(508) 824-2707
Library
(508) 823-1344

Planning Board
(508) 824-2745

Police Department
(508) 824-2716

Selectmen
(508) 824-2707

School Superintendent
(508) 824-2730

Zoning Board
(508) 824-2745

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
3,205
1990
3,921
22.3
2000
4,414
12.6
2010
4,882
10.6

The Town of Rochester was founded in 1679 and incorporated in 1686. At that time the area now known as Marion, Mattapoisett and West Wareham were all part of Rochester. These towns were subsequently separated from Rochester and by 1857 Rochester stood alone, having had the foresight to reserve rights on the seashores of other towns. This is why residents of Rochester enjoy the rights for shellfish licenses and beach use in communities not their own.

Zoning in Rochester includes industrial, general commercial and residential/agricultural uses. The town’s center includes the town hall, library, First Congregational Church and vestry. Across from these buildings is the Plumb Corner Mall, a source of pride to the town residents because it was designed to harmonize architecturally with the town green. There are several riding stables in the town as well as the Rochester Golf Club, which recently expanded its 9-hole course to an 18 hole course, and a park in the town center which serves as the location for several teams from the active Little League.

Resident describe their community as rural and residential and point out that it still retains many of the farms which were originally the foundation of the town 300 years ago. A quiet, beautiful place within which to live and grow, is their final word on their hometown.

Median Household Income $42,000
State Rank 149
% of State Average 113.7

Per Capita Income $15,807
State Rank 206
% of State Average 91.8

Labor Force
Employed 2,016
Unemployed 184
Unemployment Rate 6.5
Statewide 3.9

Population 4,022

Tax $13.95

Media
New Bedford Standard Times
Free Bird Times
The Wanderer
The Sentinel
MediaOne

Utilities
Commonwealth Electric

Water
Private wells

Sewer
Private sewer

Solid Waste
Combustion: Rochester

Form of Government
Board of Selectmen
Executive Secretary
Open town meeting

Municipal Offices

Main number
(508) 763-3871

Assessor
(508) 763-5250

Building Inspector
(508) 763-3871

Clerk
(508) 763-3871

Conservation Commission
(508) 763-3871

Department of Public Works
(508) 763-4336
Exec. Secretary/Town Manager
(508) 763-3871

Fire Department
(508) 763-2611

Health Department
(508) 763-3871

Historical Commission
(508) 763-3871

Industrial Finance Board
(508) 763-3871
Library
(508) 763-8600

Planning Board
(508) 763-3871

Police Department
(508) 763-5112

Selectmen
(508) 763-3872

School Superintendent
(508) 758-2772

Zoning Board
(508) 763-3871

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Population Trends

Year
Persons
% Change
1980
18,457
1990
19,232
4.2
2000
20,574
7.0
2010
21,632
5.1

Wareham, situated at the head of Buzzards Bay, offers an exceptional location within easy traveling distance to the Boston and Providence metropolitan areas. Boston is about one hour away and Providence is about 45 minutes away. All of the tourist amenities in the Cape Cod Canal area are available in Wareham.

The town has over 54 miles of coastline enhanced by beaches, estuaries, rivers and ponds which create a subtle contrast to a vibrant, growing community.

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