Town Square Publications

STRONG AND GROWING

Hartford and the Hartford area boast a well balanced economic stature. In addition to a broad based retail establishment, the community is the source of a wide range of manufactured products. In all, some 60 manufacturing companies are located in the city.

Hartford industry is based in three industrial parks, with a total of more than 670 acres. The newest and largest, Dodge Industrial Park, has 540 acres and has land available for new construction. The Wisconsin and Southern Railroad serves the park with a main track and a spur. Industrial land costs in Hartford are the lowest among 25 Milwaukee area industrial parks.

The Hartford Area Development Corp. (HADC) is established to help business and industry in the community. It offers a land acquisition financing program, industrial revolving loan funds, and arranges lines of credit for select firms. The HADC constructed the Innovation Center of Hartford as a small business incubator, the first of its kind in the U.S. The HADC works with local, state, and national agencies to promote economic growth in the Hartford area.

In addition, Hartford's Major Economic Development Program provides low-interest loans up to $500,000 for buildings, fixed assets, inventory, cash flow, and other purposes through the Wisconsin Development Fund. The city also has a Minor Economic Development Program designed to provide for lesser industrial needs.

Hartford's largest industrial employers are divided into several different manufacturing fields so that no one company dominates. Quad/Graphics, Inc., with 800 workers, is in printing and publishing. The firm opened its Hartford plant in 1992, with 200,000 square feet of space. By the end of 1993, the plant had 600,000 square feet.

Broan Manufacturing Co., Inc., producers of ventilation equipment, employs 750 persons. The firm has been a Hartford employer for some 40 years. Signicast Corporation, a primary metals producer, has 120 workers. Midas International Corporation has 400 workers and is part of the transportation equipment industry. With 200 workers, Menasha Packaging Corporation is an important factor in the paper and allied products industry. Two firms stand out in the fabricated metal products industry. They are Helgesen Industries, Inc., with 250 employees, and Steelcraft Corporation of Hartford, with 160 workers.

W.B. Place and Company is among the city's oldest business enterprises. Begun as a tannery, the company still specializes in leather and leather products. It employs 100 workers.

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APPLAUSE, APPLAUSE, APPLAUSE

Living in the Hartford area blends a variety of cultural pleasures, everything from concerts by a community band and community choir and performances by a local thespian group to the symphony, opera, and other high culture events available in nearby Milwaukee.

Parent and friends gather in force for concerts by the high school jazz ensemble, concert band, symphonic band, and orchestra, as well as for concerts by the school's several choruses.

Local music and thespian groups also draw crowds. Concerts by the Hartford City Band are always popular. Productions staged by the Hartford Players Community Theater play to a packed house.

The Hartford area's Council for the Performing Arts, headquartered in Jefferson, brings a range of professional talent to appreciative audiences. The organization's season covers about 10 events. In the 1997-98 season, artists such as Second City, the Chenille Sisters, Christopher Finkelmeyer, the Duttons, and the Myron Floren Orchestra, and productions like "Peter Pan," "Cat on A Hot Tin Roof," and the Missoula Children's Theatre's "Jack and The Beanstalk" are featured.

A series of festivals and special events in Washington county also draws Hartford area crowds. In late January, winter sports fans flock to the Sunburst ski hill in Kewaskum for snowboard and free style ski competitions. For Valentine's Day, the Moraine Symphony Orchestra presents a Children's concert on the campus of University of Wisconsin Washington County. On March 17, Erin township salutes its Irish heritage with a big St. Patrick's Day parade.

In mid-June, Slingerfest, in nearby Slinger, begins its two-day run with everything that makes a community festival complete. Five days in late July are devoted to the Washington County Junior Fair, with exhibits, carnival rides, music, entertainment, and lots of food and refreshments. It all takes place at the Slinger Fairgrounds.

In mid-August, the Iola Car Club offers its antique car tour and show at Hartford's Auto Museum. For three days early in September, Allenton draws more than 100 concertina artists, and hundred more interested in the concertina, for the World Concertina Congress Jamboree Festival. The event includes live concerts, food, and beverages. In mid-September, Buckskinner's Encampment, a 1800s trapper/trader get-together opens for a weekend. The event is sponsored by W.B. Place and Company, tanners and leather goods retailer in Hartford. Also in September, nearby Germantown celebrates its Hunsrucker Oktoberfest, a German fall festival with live music, a folk art show and auction, and plenty of ethnic foods and beverages.

The Hartford Library, located in the city hall building, is an important cultural asset. With an annual circulation of more than 204,000 items, the library has 86,725 books. Its total collection of 94,000 items includes video cassettes, compact disks, books on tape, and music cassettes. It offers computers for public use, with CD-ROM reference disks available. The library provides youngsters with weekly preschool story hours, Saturday craft days, and an eight-week summer reading program. During the city's 1998 sesquicentennial celebration, the library plans a reading club devoted to Wisconsin authors. Library officials expect that its local history room will see a great many visitors during the sesquicentennial year.

Proximity to Milwaukee opens the metropolitan center's full array of cultural and artistic resources. The Performing Arts Center offers concerts by the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Florentine Opera Company, the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, and the Milwaukee Ballet Company. The Milwaukee Public Museum awes its visitors with its displays and exhibits. The Milwaukee Art Center, in the War Memorial, houses an appealing collection of contemporary and primitive art. The Mitchell Park Conservatory's three identical glass domes feature colorful floral gardens and displays that are continually changed. And, the Milwaukee County Zoo, with its natural habitats, is ranked among the world's finest zoological parks. The 184-acre zoo has more than 6,000 animals, many on the endangered species list.

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FULL RANGE OF FAMILY FUN

Eons ago, the landscape of the Hartford area was created by retreating glaciers. In their wake they left deep depressions and piles of debris which over time became the kettles, kames, and moraines seen today around Hartford. Some of the depressions became bogs or lakes, while most stayed dry.

In this environment, the people of the area have developed a strong identity with the outdoors and the wonders of nature. Nearby Pike Lake is one of the area's glacially created lakes. It and Pike Lake State Park offer a wide variety of outdoor and water sports. Not far away is Big Cedar Lake, a long body of water that's popular among power boat owners.

Pike Lake State Park is the site of a kame that rises 1,300 feet above the lake, providing an impressive view of the Hartford area. The park, itself, covers 678 acres and offers miles of hiking and cross country ski trails.

Hartford's Parks and Recreation department oversees 18 city parks and recreation facilities totaling more than 185 acres. The parks offer enclosed and open shelters, play areas, picnic tables and grills, basketball courts, horseshoes, tennis courts, shuffleboard, volleyball courts, baseball and softball fields, soccer fields, wintertime ice skating, summertime floral gardens, nature study area, boating and canoeing, fishing, hiking, and biking. One park features a miniature golf course, another a fitness trail, another a swimming pool and a wading pool.

The Parks and Recreation department programs seasonal sports, recreation, and activities for residents of all ages. Among the programs scheduled are pee wee tumbling, preschool art, Energizer Dance Team, Tae Kwon Do, ice skating lessons, girls fastpitch softball, youth wrestling, football, teen ski, basketball, co-ed volleyball, men's fitness, adult softball league, golf lessons, ceramics, arts and crafts, a variety of swim-related programs, and special activities for senior citizens.

The department also sponsors the Community Choir, which meets at the Hartford Union High School's music room. The choir is now in its 38th season.

Family campers enjoy weekends and holidays at Pike Lake State Park, Glacier Hills Park, and at four private campgrounds in the area. Cyclists find the country roads in the southern part of Washington county relatively free of traffic. For off-road bikers, there's a bike trail in the nearby Kettle Moraine State Forest. The Ice Age Trail that winds throughout the state passes through the Kettle Moraine Forest. The state forest also offers groomed cross country ski trails, as do the county's parks. For downhill ski enthusiasts, two appealing hills are near Hartford, Little Switzerland, with its attractive chalet, is Slinger, and Sunburst, in Kewaskum.

Washington county boasts eight challenging public golf courses, enough to satisfy the most avid of golfers. Washington County Golf Course is a 18-hole championship course. Others include a 36-hole championship course at Richfield and a 27-hole course at Kewaskum. Hartford Country Club offers a pro shop and delightful clubhouse with elegant dining facilities that are open to the public.

A bowling center, a health and fitness center with racquetball courts, and a nearby tennis complex round out the opportunities for recreation in the Hartford area.

Senior citizens have access to the excellent, 10,000-square-foot facilities of Senior Friends, in Hartford. Open five days a week, the center offers exercise classes, choral group, art programs, cards and other games, billiards, and craft classes. The facility serves noon lunch on Tuesdays and soup, sandwiches, and desserts at noon on Thursdays. On these days, as well, there are featured speakers or other programs of interest.

Senior Friends sponsors a self-help stroke club for stroke sufferers and their families. It also has an organized bereavement group for families who have lost loved ones. In addition the senior center organizes trips to area and Midwest entertainment events. The building is available on weekends for private parties and is equipped with a full kitchen and a bar.

The Brewers baseball games draw Hartford area residents to the Milwaukee County Stadium. The Milwaukee Bucks, NBA basketball team, plays at the city's Bradley Center, also the site for games of the Milwaukee Admirals, an International Hockey League team, and the Milwaukee Wave, an indoor soccer team.

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PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

The schools of Hartford aim for excellence in all aspects of education, from buildings and equipment to instructors and programs. Public education is the function of two independent school systems. School District of Hartford Joint No. 1 operates two elementary schools and a middle school, while the Hartford Union High School District operates the community's senior high school.

Lincoln and Rossman, kindergarten through fifth grade schools, focus on providing the basics of language arts, mathematics, and social studies, augmented by art, music, and physical education. Fifth graders are introduced to band and orchestra. The schools offer programs for gifted students as well as special education classes for those with exceptional educational needs. At Central Middle School, housing sixth, seventh, and eighth grades, the curriculum expands to include English, science, literature, technology, and vocal music. A variety of interscholastic and intramural sports, extracurricular activities, clubs, and organizations are also available.

Between now and 2002, the School District of Hartford plans to have all schools on the Internet, establish additional computer labs, and integrate technology into the curriculum.

More than 1,600 students are enrolled in Hartford Union High School. They choose from some 220 different courses, including 20 honors courses and advanced placement courses in art history, advanced psychology, U.S. history, micro/macro economics, computer science, calculus, and critical response to literature.

Reflecting the agricultural area that surrounds Hartford, the high school teaches 16 different agribusiness courses. There is also emphasis on technology, preparing students for entry level employment in numerous fields or continued education at a technical college. Several technical courses earn college credit, thanks to agreements between the high school and three area technical colleges.

Music students have opportunities to participate in marching band, concert band, symphonic band, jazz ensemble, orchestra, and several choirs and choruses. In addition, the school offers more than 20 extracurricular clubs and special interest organizations. It also fields a full roster of winning sports teams for boy and girls.

The community has exceptional alternatives to public education for parents who prefer to educate their children in a religious environment. St. Killian School, operated by Catholic St. Killian Church, is a kindergarten through eighth grade school offering a sound curriculum with a religious foundation. Peace Lutheran Church also has a kindergarten through eighth grade elementary school with a strong religion-based curriculum.

As a convenience to working parents, the community has three child day care and prechools. The Child's Place, Happy Hollow Learning Center, and The Sycamore Tree Christian Child Care Center, all provide day care services and learning opportunities for young children. The Sycamore Tree also offers latchkey services.

Higher Education

CONTINUING EXCELLENCE

It's a short commute to higher education for Hartford students intent on a university degree or technical college training.

One of three Moraine Technical College campuses is located in West Bend, only a few minutes drive from Hartford through beautiful Wisconsin countryside. The West Bend campus awards associate degrees and technical diplomas. The campus also provides continuing education courses, as does the college's instruction center at Hartford Union High School.

The college offers more than 50 associate degree programs in agriculture/biotechnology, computer information systems/accounting, drafting and design, electricity/electronics, food service, graphics, health, manufacturing, marketing/management, mechanical service trades, office technology, and public service. Another 12 career areas earn technical certificates.

The success of the college can be measured in employment. More than 95 percent of graduates are employed in their chosen fields within six months of graduation.

More than 600 students enroll annually at the University of Wisconsin Washington County campus in West Bend. The campus sits on an 87-acre hilltop location on West Bend's southwest side, easily reached from Hartford. The university consists of four fully-connected buildings with classrooms (including two state-of-the-art multimedia classrooms), science laboratories and a greenhouse, theater, gymnasium rooms, ceramic and art studies, computer labs, music ensemble and practice rooms, a piano lab, photography darkroom, food co-op and cafeteria, bookstore, student union, and faculty and administration offices.

The college provides the first two years of work toward a bachelor's degree and guarantees transfer to a University of Wisconsin system institution as a junior. In addition to academic programs, the West Bend campus offers more than 250 majors in a variety of career areas, including architecture and environmental design, business, computer science, fine and applied arts, health professions, interdisciplinary studies, physical mathematics, and social sciences.

Three major universities are within easy reach for Hartford students. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin at Madison are four-year institutions and the only doctoral degree granting institutions in the University of Wisconsin System. Marquette University, in Milwaukee, is a leading Catholic university offering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in a variety of academic fields. Its impressive urban campus occupies a large area close to the city's downtown business center.

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EXPERT ATTENTION WHEN NEEDED

Hartford area families take comfort in knowing that they have ready access to expert medical care when needed, thanks to an in-town hospital and a system of local clinics.

Hartford Memorial Hospital, a member of Aurora Health Care, is located near the center of the community. An acute care hospital, Hartford Memorial has 96 physicians on its medical staff representing most medical specialties. The hospital's 24-hour emergency department is staffed by physicians and nurses specially trained in emergency medicine and trauma.

The hospital's medical services are many. It offers cardiac and cancer care; a family-centered birthing center; physical, occupational, and speech therapy; industrial and cardiac rehabilitation services; same day surgery, sports medicine, a sleep disorder lab, and a pain management center. In addition, it offers respite care, hospice care, and occupational medicine.

Hartford Memorial employs state-of-the-art diagnostic tools, among them magnetic resonance imaging, CT scan, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and x-ray. It also provides EKG and stress test procedures as part of its cardiac services.

The hospital reaches out to the community with programs such as its lifeline emergency response system and various health education classes. Other services include adult day care, an aid to families with aging or impaired members.

Aurora Health Care has three medical clinics in the Hartford area, one in Hartford, one in nearby Slinger, and one in Hustisford. Physicians serving at these clinics are on staff at Hartford Memorial Hospital.

Lone Oak Health Center, located in the center of the expanding commercial area on Hartford's east side, is a newly constructed, multi-tenant facility containing 40,000 square feet of space. It offers comprehensive health care services and health-related retail products for the entire family. The center is an affiliate of Horizon Ventures Limited, LLC, who partners include Horizon Healthcare Inc., Community Memorial Hospital of Menomonee Falls, and Columbia/St. Mary’s Inc.

Lone Oak Health Center tenants include Medical Associates Health Centers, Community Memorial Hospital Physical Therapy, Horizon Home Care and Hospice, Home Care Medical, and Medical Associates - The Eye Center.

Medical Associates Health Centers, the anchoring tenant, is a 90-physician multi-specialty medical clinic with offices in several southeast Wisconsin cities. The physicians at Medical Associates specialize in family practice, podiatry, orthopaedics, ophthalmology, and cardiology. The center's other services include laboratory, x-ray, and mammography.

The Hartford area has five excellent short and long term care nursing homes offering skilled nursing care. One is located within the city, while others are only a short drive away. Home care and hospice are also available. The area also has several retirement centers and communities which offer varying modes of living from independent to assisted.

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SERVING THE PEOPLE

Hartford citizens share the best of two worlds, the responsiveness of elected officials and the management skills of a professional city administrator. Government consists of a mayor and nine alderpersons elected from three districts. The city council hires a professional city administrator to oversee the day to day operations of government and carry out council mandates.

Hartford is an enhanced 911 community and the police communications center dispatches emergency assistance. The Hartford Police Department has 21 sworn officers and a civilian staff of nine people. Officers patrol some 50 miles of city streets in six squad cars.

The department promotes the national D.A.R.E anti-drug program and participates in a multi-jurisdictional drug unit consisting of representatives of every governmental agency in Washington county. It also encourages Neighborhood Watch programs and provides Operation ID services. The department also provides home security checks and security evaluations for retailers.

There is a school liaison officer and officers participate in an Adopt a School program, assuring that a police officer will be at the city's elementary schools when they open to greet and talk to youngsters.

Hartford's Police Department can be found on the Internet, address: http:/www.nconnect.net/~hfpd.

The Hartford Fire Department consists of 40 paid-on-call volunteers. They operate out of one centrally located station. The station houses four pumpers, a 95-foot aerial ladder truck, two grass fire vehicles, an equipment truck, and two 1,800-gallon tankers.

Firefighters work with youngsters who have fire starting problems and they work with the schools in spring and fall, teaching fire prevention and safety. "Learn Not To Burn" is one of its school-oriented programs. In addition, the department has a mobile fire safety house which firefighters take to the schools to teach youngsters how to escape from a smoke-filled building.

The city of Hartford provides electrical power to residents, purchasing electricity through Wisconsin Public Power, a consortium of municipal electric utilities. The city also provides water from eight wells with a pumping capacity of 3,100,000 gallons per day. About half that amount is consumed daily. Hartford provides solid waste collection service for residents. Commercial and industrial waste is collected by private services. Waste water treatment is also provided by the city.

Natural gas is provided by Wisconsin Gas Company and telephone service is provided by Ameritech.

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